Friday, August 17, 2018

Fit For Life: Your 70s

Your body changes with each passing year - and your workout program should, too. "Fitness is a marathon" says trainer Billy Anderson. It's the accumulation of fitness over time that matters. Focusing on strength, coordination, cardiovascular fitness and mobility is vital at every age. Today I continue a series of blogs offering insights on what it takes to stay fit in each decade of life.


In Your 70s

SLOW & STEADY

You can continue to strength train, do cardio, stretch, hike and even pursue-high impact activities - as long as you take your time, monitor your response, and adjust accordingly.

Chronological age is not a good indicator of biological age. Some people who are in their 80s are as agile & vibrant as some in their 60s. Physical activity could be one of the factors that contributes to the difference. The body deteriorates with time, yet how quickly and drastically those changes happen can be up to you.

If you haven't strength trained regularly, muscle loss may now reach critical levels, interfering with balance, gait and other daily activities. But if you take up strength training in this decade, those changes are reversible.  A number of studies including adults in their 70s have found that progressive strength training can lead to increased muscle mass, more ease with activities like climbing stairs and carrying groceries, better balance and reduced joint pain. Most exercisers in this group find strength training empowering. People get excited when they see and feel the results of their hard work. It may take a little longer, but septuagenarians can reach really impressive results.
You may need to do a longer warm-up and incorporate more rest between sets by the time you reach your 70s. Monitor your heart rate and muscle soreness to determine how fast to progress with your chosen activity. If you are just starting out, recruit a pro who can help you develop appropriate workout strategies. The price you pay is negligible compared to the benefits for life.


 Slow & steady wins the race in your 70s. You can pursue all types of exercise - just spend a bit more time warming up, then monitor your response and adjust as needed. Remember: strength training is the key to maintaining balance.

Stay Active (in your 70s), Keep Moving and
Enjoy Your Food

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