Friday, December 28, 2018

New Year's Day 5K & Pancakes

 5K and Pancake Breakfast on New Year's Day at 8:30am. 

Join me for New Year's Day morning. This 5K is for walkers, joggers, runners or rollerbladers. Strollers are welcome. It is completely free for my personal training community, my walking group, my YMCA community and my blog community. Invite your friends and family. We will start 2019 with a bright, happy morning of movement and yummy pancakes. New Year's hats and noisemakers optional!

Email Ann to RSVP and get the location details


Plan now to invite friends and to join us at 8:30am New Year's morning.

Friday, December 21, 2018

Merry Christmas!

 Merry Christmas! 
Thanks to all of you in my private training, group fitness and blog communities who have helped make 2018 a fabulous year at Priority Fitness Burbank. 
I've had a wonderful time getting to know some of you better and helping you prioritize fitness in your lives. It's great to see progress and 
have fun working out together. 
I hope to see many of you at the New Year's Day 5K and Pancake Breakfast!
Anticipating many more times of fun and fitness in 2019.

Saturday, December 15, 2018

Savor The Season

The holiday season can feel more like the season of stress and long lines than "the most wonderful time of the year." Want to make a change for 2018? There’s a helpful technique you can use to maximize your joy this holiday season — it’s called savoring.


Savoring is deliberately enhancing and prolonging your positive moods, experiences, and emotions. You’ve probably done it before. Perhaps you closed your eyes to help you appreciate a moving symphony performance; or stared in awe at your infant’s smile, trying to make sure you remembered every aspect of that moment.

Consciously savoring the good things in life is important, because neuroscience research suggests that our brains have a negativity bias. Negative things tend to stand out in our minds, while positive things tend to be easily dismissed or forgotten.

One strategy is to simply bask in positive experiences when they come along. Much like the practice of mindfulness, this type of savoring involves being present in the current moment and aware of sensory information. But unlike mindfulness, which emphasizes detached observation, in-the-moment savoring involves actively seeking out and soaking in the positive emotions.

This comes more easily when you set your intentions ahead of time regarding where, when, and what you’re going to savor. For instance, if you plan to savor your family holiday dinner, you might notice more of the little quirks that you love about your relatives, feel more grateful for your time together, and be less perturbed by a snide comment or a dry turkey.

Whatever the occasion, remember to take in the enjoyable sensations: sight, sound, taste, smell and touch. Focus on the emotional and relational aspects of the experience and hold on to them for as long as you can.

All new habits take some practice, so don’t be frustrated if you forget to fully notice a moment or if you don’t feel positive results right away. With time and practice, these savoring strategies will help bring joy to your world and a happy new year.

Stay Active, Savor Holiday Happy Moments and
Enjoy Your Food

Thursday, December 13, 2018

New Year's Day 5K & Pancake Breakfast

We are half-way through our Daily Mile Challenge Streak. Keep up the good work of adding in more movement each day between Thanksgiving and New Year's Day. We'll finish out the Challenge with a fun 5 K and Pancake Breakfast on New Year's Day at 8:30am.

If you haven't joined us for the Daily Streak, you can still join in for the New Year's Day fun. The 5K is for walkers, joggers, runners or rollerbladers. Strollers are welcome. Invite your friends and family. We will start 2019 with a bright, happy morning of movement and yummy pancakes.

Text Ann to RSVP and get the location details. 818-326-2095
or email her here. PriorityFitnessBurbank.com


Plan now to invite friends and to join us at 8:30am New Year's morning.

Sunday, December 9, 2018

Move More #3

We're a nation of sitters. TV binge-watching, desk jobs, and the allure of the internet all contribute to that fact that most of us spend at least 50% of our day sitting down. The more we sit, the higher our risk of first-world diseases of affluence: diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease and cancer.

We need to recognize that it's as important to decrease overall sedentary time as it is to maintain a regular practice of intense, formal exercise. How can we resist the call of the sofa and work more movement into our daily lives? Today's blog is a continuation of an occasional series on moving more.

Reframe Your Mindset
When Harvard psychologist Ellen Langer told a group of hotel maids that their daily tasks counted as exercise, it led to measurable improvements in their blood pressure, body fat, and waist-to-hip ratios after only one month. How you feel about movement - whether or not it counts as exercise - makes a difference in how it affects you.


Reframe physical tasks like putting up Christmas decorations, making beds, washing your car, yard work and taking out the trash as mini-investments in your health to reap greater benefits. 

Gear Up
When you dress inappropriately for the season or activity, you create a built-in excuse for staying indoors and moving less. When you have the right gear, you will move more often.


Invest in shoes that allow you to walk comfortably for work and home, regardless of weather or terrain. Choose warm gloves and a hat for the cold season. Find a coat that keeps you warm and is also made for movement. Choose a comfortable, non-restrictive swimsuit for the summer. Search out wicking fabrics for moving in warm weather.

Fly Fit
Air Travel is usually cited for its pitfalls: chiefly, long hours in a confined seated position.


Stretch your arms overhead whenever you think of it. When you get up to use the bathroom, circle your arms and roll your shoulders. March in place a few times at your seat. At the gate, walk around and stretch rather than planting yourself in a chair. You're not only moving, but you'll also arrive at your destination feeling fresher.


Acknowledge exercise in chores throughout the day, choose the right gear 
and move on the airplane this month.


Stay Active, Keep Moving and
Enjoy Your Food

Friday, November 30, 2018

Cranberries!

I'm guessing most of you had some cranberries last week as part of your Thanksgiving dinner. I enjoy cranberry sauce, too, but have recently found that cranberries are not just for sauce. Include them in your weekly meal plan  - they'll add variety and a little tart surprise to your meals.

Cranberries are a healthy addition to your diet due to their high nutrient and antioxidant content. They are often referred to as a "super food." Half a cup of cranberries contains only 25 calories. They are high in vitamin C, vitamin A, and vitamin K. They also contain proanthocyanidins (PACs), an antioxidant that may help prevent a range of diseases, especially cardiovascular disease. Cranberry may help prevent Streptococcus mutans (an oral bacteria that contributes to tooth decay and cavities) from sticking to teeth, according to a 2015 study.

Dried sweetened cranberries are a special sweet treat. Try these ideas for incorporating fresh unsweetened cranberries into your day. The tart flavor will add sparkle to your meal.

*Add to your morning smoothie

*Mix sliced cranberries with vanilla yogurt

*Add to a chicken and spinach salad at lunchtime

*Roast with cubed butternut squash. Top with a little feta.

*Try this recipe for acorn squash and cranberries.


Stay Active, Keep Moving and
Enjoy Your Cranberries This Week

Friday, November 23, 2018

Symptoms of Stress

Most of us agree that stress has a physical affect on our bodies. What are some of the ways our bodies react to stress? Becoming aware of some symptoms could help you know when you need to implement tools to make changes to a hectic lifestyle, especially during this holiday season.


Your ears become super sensitive
Stress-related exhaustion can cause sounds to bother you a lot more than normal. Even a standard-level conversation can grate on your nerves.
To Try: noise-canceling headphones or soothing nature sounds.


Your memory takes a hit
Chronic stress weakens brain synapses, reducing the ability to form memories. Researchers found stressed animals that exercised had the same synapse function as those that were stress-free.
To Try: keep up with a regular workout, especially when you are extra busy.


You gain weight
Several studies have linked stress to a larger waist and BMI. Stress hormones trigger your body to store more fat, and tension can make you eat more sugary, fatty foods for comfort.
To Try: During tense times, avoid using food as comfort and go for a walk. Walking can relieve stress and bump up your metabolism.


Your stomach is messed up
Anxiety can be as bad for your digestive system as bingeing on junk food. Stressed animals had gut bacteria that looked like they'd been eating a high-fat diet.
To Try: Probiotics. Not only do they add good bacteria to your colon, studies have shown that eating foods with probiotics can help prevent stressful habits, like rumination. 


Find quiet, keep walking or try a probiotic to help reduce stress this holiday season.

Stay Active, Keep Moving and
Enjoy Your Food

Friday, November 16, 2018

Holiday Running Streak


The holiday season is a perfect time to ditch your workouts with excuses of too little time, lack of energy, and no motivation. That doesn't have to be you! More and more people are turning toward a “running streak” to stay motivated, running at least one mile every single day, from Thanksgiving until the New Year

But isn't running every single day bad for you? Running hard and long every single day will certainly lead to burnout or injury. However, you only need to run one mile every day to keep this streak alive, and that mile can be as slow and easy as you want it to be. 



I've done this running streak the last few years and I really felt good. If I had done a tough workout that day or it was late in the day when I was tired, my mile might be a stroll. On the other hand, if I felt energized, I jogged the whole mile. My dog, Sadie Mae, benefited by getting in an extra mile walk or jog during the holidays, too.

This year I am adding something new! I will host a New Year's Day 5K and Pancake Breakfast. We will meet on New Year's morning, run or walk 3 miles and then celebrate our amazing achievement with pancakes! I'll share more details as you get close to finishing your running streak. 

But this is your motivator. Get out there and get that daily mile in so you can celebrate in 2019. Start with the YMCA Turkey Trot on Thanksgiving Day and keep moving until the New Year's Day 5K & Pancake Breakfast. Begin 2019 with energy!



Stay Active, Keep Moving and
Enjoy Your Food

Friday, November 9, 2018

Burbank YMCA Turkey Trot

More Americans participate in races on Thanksgiving Day than any other day of the year! 

Join the crowd and start your holiday on the right foot by participating in the Burbank Community YMCA Turkey Trot. This family-friendly 5K/10K race is open to runners, walkers, stroller-pushers and pets. Costumes welcome!

There is a Pre-Race Expo for all and a Kid's Fun Zone for the little ones. In addition, you'll get a commemorative tech T-shirt to wear around town throughout the year. Everyone will know you did the race Thanksgiving morning.

The Turkey Trot is a great Burbank community day with people from all areas of city life coming together to move their bodies before sitting down to dinner.  It's fun to see so many friends gathered for the event.

John and I will participate with our family, including a stroller, two babies and two dogs, while wearing turkey headwear and Pilgrim hats.  Look for us!

The race is only a couple of weeks away! Register at burbankymca.org


Stay Active, Keep Moving on Thanksgiving Day and
Enjoy Your Food

Saturday, November 3, 2018

Power Snacks

One of the keys to eating right is forethought. It requires you to think about your daily schedule, plan good food choices for each meal or situation, and then shop and prepare the ingredients.

Snack times can be food-quality landmines if you are not prepared. Plan amazing treats for those mid-afternoon munchies and then shop, prepare and pack them for office success.

Better Than Peanut Butter
NuttZo is a spread that blends seven nuts and seeds. It's packed with protein, healthy fats and fiber. Pair it with apple or banana slices for a winning protein/carb combo. It even comes in chocolate!


A Twist on Bagels & Lox
Rediscover Wasa crackers. I bought these again recently and have thoroughly enjoyed them. Spread with labneh, top with smoked salmon and  pickled red onion. The combination of fiber, protein and healthy fat is a guaranteed hunger buster.


New Veggie & Dip
Trade carrots and ranch for radishes and almond butter. The combo is creamy & crunchy, rich and fresh.


Choose good fuel to power you past the afternoon nap and fuel your work for the rest of the day.

Stay Active, Keep Moving and
Enjoy Your Food

Friday, October 26, 2018

Essential Hormones #2

Every time you exercise, special hormones in your body spring into action. They give you energy, or spark your motivation, or boost your mood. Dr. Katherine Borer at the University of Michigan says, "Hormones are essential for your ability to workout effectively. They improve heart and lung function, they bring fuel to your muscles, and they help your body recover afterward." Check out this up-to-the-minute info on workout hormones.

Growth Factors
When you workout, the body releases hormones such as insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and proteins like brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF). IGF-1 and VEGF help repair the muscle damage caused by exercise which builds the fibers back stronger. These growth factors also strengthen memory and cognitive function.

Different workouts stimulate different hormones. HIIT exercises raise VEGF, heavy weight lifting raises IGF-1, and endurance activities raise BDNF levels.

Take Away? Change up your routine regularly.

Irisin
This increases the activity of the genes that convert white-fat cells into brown, a beneficial type of fat that can burn calories. Irisin may reduce white-fat stores, too.

Workouts that target large muscle groups like glutes or pecs typically release more irisin that exercises that work smaller muscles, like calves and biceps.

Take Away? Endurance activities like running, or heavy weight lifting like CrossFit, can stimulate irisin production. 
 
Additionally, there's also evidence that increasing levels of melatonin, the sleep hormone, may bump up irisin production. Sleep well and burn fat, too!

Take Away? Eat melatonin-rich foods like walnuts and tart cherries as an evening treat.

Interested in more information? Learn about BDNF in these posts:

Find out more about irisin here:

Stay Active, Keep Moving (with a varied workout)
 and Enjoy Your Food

Friday, October 12, 2018

Move More #2

We're a nation of sitters. TV binge-watching, desk jobs, and the allure of the internet all contribute to that fact that most of us spend at least 50% of our day sitting down. The more we sit, the higher our risk of first-world diseases of affluence: diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease and cancer.

We need to recognize that it's as important to decrease overall sedentary time as it is to maintain a regular practice of intense, formal exercise. How can we resist the call of the sofa and work more movement into our daily lives?

Empower Yourself
Strangely enough, fitness programs can make us feel less empowered to be physical on our own. Remember, the point of formal training, like a group fitness class or a morning run, is to make movement more accessible and joyful in your life outside the gym.

Start putting your gym fitness moves into play everywhere else: play Frisbee, run up a flight of stairs, jump off a low wall, kick a soccer ball. Make those lunges, squat jumps and push kicks you do in the gym pay off playing in the park with friends and family. Enjoy moving!


Treat Your Feet
Your smallest muscles can dramatically affect how you feel and move. Experts suggest focusing on the feet for big results. There are 33 joints in the foot but we use about 3 of them. Hard-soled shoes and flat walking surfaces offer the feet little stimulation.

Solve that by going barefoot whenever possible and massaging your feet with a small ball daily. Massage can open up the fascia and musculature that runs between and around your foot joints. Surprisingly, this small action can also release the hamstrings, hips, and lower back - setting you up for more freedom of motion later on.



Have confidence in your body's ability to move this week and 
give your feet some well-deserved TLC.

Stay Active, Keep Moving and 
Enjoy Your Food



Friday, September 28, 2018

Move More

We're a nation of sitters. TV binge-watching, desk jobs, and the allure of the internet all contribute to that fact that most of us spend at least 50% of our day sitting down. The more we sit, the higher our risk of first-world diseases of affluence: diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease and cancer.

The disheartening part is that formal exercise - like walking, cycling, or hitting the gym for 30 minutes or so each day does not completely protect us from these health risks. A Lancet study found that you need to exercise 60 - 75 minutes daily to undo the damage of a sedentary lifestyle.

We need to recognize that it's as important to decrease overall sedentary time as it is to maintain a regular practice of intense, formal exercise. How can we resist the call of the sofa and work more movement into our daily lives?

Change Positions
Sitting, lying, kneeling, or squatting on or as close to the floor as much as possible can pay big dividends in hip mobility, spine health and kinesthetic awareness, while simultaneously encouraging more movement. Sit on the floor while working on your laptop or playing with children. Lie on the floor while playing tug with the dog. Squat as close to the floor as possible while gardening or scrolling social media.

Steal Steps
A 2017 study found that average Americans take fewer than 4,800 steps per day, less than half the 10,000 many health experts recommend. Whenever and wherever you can, steal a few hundred steps. Park farther away from the door at the market; take the stairs, not the elevator; walk to lunch or to pick up the kids. Small changes can net you several thousand steps a day.

Walk & Talk
Conversation is an important part of life, but only convention says you need to do it sitting down. In fact, conversation may be more gratifying and productive in combination with movement. A 2014 study found that walking boosts creativity and the free flow of ideas.

So go ahead and grab coffee with your friend - but instead of taking a seat, walk while you talk. Ditto for phone conversations, which you can conduct on your cell using headphones virtually anywhere. You'll squeeze in additional movement and may enjoy livelier conversations, too.


Stay Active, Keep Moving, Sit Less and
Enjoy Your Food

Friday, September 21, 2018

Invite the Fab Four to Breakfast!

Breakfast is important; after all, it's the breaking of your nighttime fast. It should provide enough nutrition energy, mental focus, and appetite management to get you through the first part of your day. But this is where most American breakfasts fail. Whole-grain bagels, bran muffins, instant oatmeal, and fruit smoothies are low on nutrition and high on glycemic load. The sugar spike they induce will leave you flat in a few hours.

Build your breakfast primarily from the Fab Four - protein, fat, phytonutrients and fiber. That takes the most common breakfast foods (cereal and pastries) out of the equation. Try these three breakfast options to hit the mark on the Fab Four.

This Quick Trick Snack Stack is from Pilar Gerasimo at Experience Life magazine. Eat this with milk instead of a bowl of cereal. (You may want to click on the picture below to enlarge & read it more easily.)


Try a veggie scramble.

Start with sauteed or roasted cruciferous vegetables such as cauliflower, cabbage, bok choy, or broccoli. You can also add a root vegetable, such as carrot or beet, squash or sweet potato for additional substance. Stir in one to three eggs depending on your energy needs appetite. Finish with a snipped leafy vegetable, combining until wilted.



Load up with a protein shake.

Start with a low-sugar fruit such as blueberries or cranberries. Combine with veggies such as cucumber, zucchini or de-stemmed leafy greens. Add in the protein & fat - walnuts, yogurt, nut butter or seeds. Combine with dairy or nut milk or water to reach the desired consistency. Experiment to find the combinations that work for you. You can add unsweetened protein powder, collagen or supergreens, if you like. Just go easy on the fruit and strive to include the Fab Four in each breakfast shake.



A good breakfast wards off energy dips, brain fog and afternoon cravings. 
Start your day with the Fab Four everyday. 

Stay Active, Keep Moving and
Enjoy Your Fab Four this week
 


Friday, September 14, 2018

Sweat It!

You've probably said it before: "That workout (or teacher) really made me sweat. I got a great workout!" But is that really true? Here are the answers to a couple of sweaty questions.

 The fitter I get, the more I sweat. Why is that?

Mary Beth Brown a professor at Indiana University, says. "There are two main reasons. One is that as you improve your fitness, you tend to exercise more intensely, which can make you sweat more. "

"The other is that you get better at sweating the more you do it." You'll start perspiring earlier in your workout, and more of your sweat glands will activate to help rid your body of excess heat.

The more I sweat, the better the workout, right?

How much you sweat is tied to what type of activity you're doing, your age and genetics. A better indicator of your performance is how difficult it is to talk midway through cardio exercise. During a moderate-intensity workout, you should be able to speak in broken sentences; during vigorous exercise, you should only be able to manage a few words. 

Can you really sweat out toxins?

Juan Del Cosco, a professor of human physiology says, "Yes, but....not enough to have a measurable health benefit." If your body needs to get rid of something noxious, your kidneys will flush it into your urine, not your sweat. The best way to detox is to drink plenty of water and eat veggies with a high water content.

Why do I sweat so long after my workout?

Mary Beth Brown explains, "When you stop exercising, your body continues to generate heat to fuel functions like restocking your energy stores and redistributing your blood flow." As a result, your core temperature can stay elevated, triggering perspiration after your shower.

To cool down and dry off quicker, refrain from taking a cold shower. The icy water constricts your blood vessels, causing hot blood from your skin to rush to your core, raising your body temperature. Instead, take a tepid shower and stand in front of a fan to evaporate any lingering sweat before it beads up. In addition, drink ice-cold water during your workout to minimize the rise in core temperature.
 Stay Active, Keep Moving (and sweating!) and
Enjoy Your Food 



Friday, September 7, 2018

It's Still Time for Ice Cream

With the Labor Day holiday in the rear-view mirror, it seems as if autumn is officially here. But, at least in Southern California, the warm summer weather will be with us for at least another month. That means there's more time for ice cream! Try these treats for healthy ways to indulge your sweet tooth.

Bananas Galore
Slice, freeze, and puree bananas for a vegan, no-sugar-added frozen dessert. Customize with other frozen fruits for amazing flavor. How about Ginger Peach "ice cream" with raspberry sauce?

Ice Cream Sandwiches
Use graham cracker squares instead of chocolate-chip coolies. Fill with frozen yogurt or slow-churned ice cream. Slow-churned can have half the fat of regular ice cream.

A Smarter Sundae
Start with one scoop of ice cream. Fill the rest of the bowl with fruit. Add a touch of chocolate syrup (lower calorie than hot fudge) and sprinkle with a tablespoon or two of nuts or granola.
Read labels carefully.
That "light" ice cream could be full of artificial sugar. Yikes! Avoid artificial sugar.

Manufacturers add extra sugar to low-fat ice cream to make it more appealing. Recent studies have found that added sugar can actually lead to more weight gain than if you eat standard products. When you eat more sugar, you crave more. When you eat a standard product, the fat makes you feel full & satisfied with a smaller portion.

Slow churned ice cream is made using a combination of nonfat milk and milk, sugar, and flavorings. It has less fat and usually has less sugar, as well, than standard formulas. 

Be an informed consumer. Make good choices tailored to your health needs and your preferences. 


There are lots of healthy and delicious ways to indulge 
while the warm weather lasts.  

Stay Active, Keep Moving and
Enjoy Your Sweet Treats!




Friday, August 31, 2018

Fit For Life: In Your 80s & 90s

Your body changes with each passing year - and your workout program should, too. "Fitness is a marathon" says trainer Billy Anderson. It's the accumulation of fitness over time that matters. Focusing on strength, coordination, cardiovascular fitness and mobility is vital at every age. Today I continue a series of blogs offering insights on what it takes to stay fit in each decade of life.



In Your 80s, 90s and Beyond (Mary, this is for you!)

EVOLVE   

By this point nearly everyone has aches and pains from previous injuries, arthritis or chronic overuse. You might be tempted to believe you're too old to work out - and, that rest is the best. But too much rest may do more harm than good. Bed rest has been shown to be associated with loss of strength, bone loss, joint disease and high blood pressure. It is one reason falls are a danger for people over 80: the resulting injuries may heal but the health complications from staying in bed for weeks can be irreversible. Rest when you're sick or injured - but get up and move as much as you're able as soon as you're able.

The best way to avoid falling may be regular workouts. A 2016 study showed that exercise can reduce fall frequency by nearly 40 percent. Another study showed that only a few weeks of strength training doubled the power of 85 year olds and reduced the need for walkers and wheelchairs. Exercise also reduces the likelihood of cognitive decline. Your mind and body continue to derive considerable benefits from regular workouts right up to and including the tenth decade.


The key to exercise in this decade is the same as it was in your 20s: find an enjoyable activity that challenges you without risking injury. This might be the time to substitute cycling for running, swimming for jumping, and machine-based strength training for free weights. Remember that your muscles, joints and bones remain adaptable. If you exercise consistently, an activity that you thought was impossible months ago may become possible again.


In your 80s and 90s, rest wisely but move often, strength train to prevent falls, and choose challenging but safe movement.

Stay Active (in your 80s & beyond), Keep Moving and
Enjoy Your Food

Friday, August 24, 2018

Fall Group Interval Training

Fall Group Interval Training dates are available now! New for Fall 2018,  I'm blocking out four Saturdays in a row. Contact me to register for one or all of the dates. Choose the early 7:30 time slot or sleep in a bit and choose the 9:00am. The sessions are limited to eight participants so you'll want to reserve your spot soon. Hope to see you there!




Friday, August 17, 2018

Fit For Life: Your 70s

Your body changes with each passing year - and your workout program should, too. "Fitness is a marathon" says trainer Billy Anderson. It's the accumulation of fitness over time that matters. Focusing on strength, coordination, cardiovascular fitness and mobility is vital at every age. Today I continue a series of blogs offering insights on what it takes to stay fit in each decade of life.


In Your 70s

SLOW & STEADY

You can continue to strength train, do cardio, stretch, hike and even pursue-high impact activities - as long as you take your time, monitor your response, and adjust accordingly.

Chronological age is not a good indicator of biological age. Some people who are in their 80s are as agile & vibrant as some in their 60s. Physical activity could be one of the factors that contributes to the difference. The body deteriorates with time, yet how quickly and drastically those changes happen can be up to you.

If you haven't strength trained regularly, muscle loss may now reach critical levels, interfering with balance, gait and other daily activities. But if you take up strength training in this decade, those changes are reversible.  A number of studies including adults in their 70s have found that progressive strength training can lead to increased muscle mass, more ease with activities like climbing stairs and carrying groceries, better balance and reduced joint pain. Most exercisers in this group find strength training empowering. People get excited when they see and feel the results of their hard work. It may take a little longer, but septuagenarians can reach really impressive results.
You may need to do a longer warm-up and incorporate more rest between sets by the time you reach your 70s. Monitor your heart rate and muscle soreness to determine how fast to progress with your chosen activity. If you are just starting out, recruit a pro who can help you develop appropriate workout strategies. The price you pay is negligible compared to the benefits for life.


 Slow & steady wins the race in your 70s. You can pursue all types of exercise - just spend a bit more time warming up, then monitor your response and adjust as needed. Remember: strength training is the key to maintaining balance.

Stay Active (in your 70s), Keep Moving and
Enjoy Your Food

Friday, August 10, 2018

Fit For Life: Your 60s

Your body changes with each passing year - and your workout program should, too. "Fitness is a marathon" says trainer Billy Anderson. It's the accumulation of fitness over time that matters. Focusing on strength, coordination, cardiovascular fitness and mobility is vital at every age. Today I continue a series of blogs offering insights on what it takes to stay fit in each decade of life.



In Your 60s

CHALLENGE YOURSELF

You may be tempted to put less effort into your workouts in this decade, but strenuous workouts now will pay more dividends than ever. Almost every age-related illness - be it cardiovascular, metabolic, psychiatric, neurological, pulmonary or cancer - has been shown to benefit from exercise in the form of improving quality of life, lowering the risk of disease, and decreasing mortality.

One near constant at this age is stiffer joints.  Movement of any kind floods the joints with oxygenated blood. Mobility and flexibility exercises that involve large, controlled range of motion in the ankles, hips, shoulders and upper back can be particularly effective. Try a yoga class and work mobility into your daily routine.



Balance exercises are as important as strength training & endurance when you are over 60. Try single-leg balancing or walking a "tightrope". Walk, jog or run on uneven surfaces.

Training for power as well as strength becomes increasingly important in this decade. (Check out this blog for info on the difference between power & strength.) Power training is a safeguard against falling and other declines in function that are common later in life.

Try this power squat: choose a medium-heavy weight. Slowly lower into the squat, then push up to standing as fast as possible. You can even jump both feet off the floor, if desired. For a power bench press, slowly lower the weight toward your chest, then push up as though you were punching the weight into the ceiling.


Whatever physical movement or exercise you choose - tennis, rock climbing, ballroom dancing - strike a balance between respecting your limitations and challenging yourself. Muscle responds the same way to exercise regardless of age. Your body remains adaptable all your life.

In your 60s, it's all about maintaining range of motion, balance & power moves. 

Stay Active (in your 60s), Keep Moving and
Enjoy Your Food

Monday, August 6, 2018

Fit For Life: Your 50s

Your body changes with each passing year - and your workout program should, too. "Fitness is a marathon" says trainer Billy Anderson. It's the accumulation of fitness over time that matters. Focusing on strength, coordination, cardiovascular fitness and mobility is vital at every age. Today I continue a series of blogs offering insights on what it takes to stay fit in each decade of life.



In Your 50s

DIAL IT UP

At 50, you may feel your active days are behind you, but telling yourself you're over the hill may hurt you more than the activities you're avoiding. Leisurely pursuits have their place, but there's no substitute for the intensity of intervals, strength training and plyometrics. 

When you reduce the intensity of your workout, athletic performance declines, cardiovascular fitness is reduced and bone density suffers, especially in women. In short, when you stop pushing yourself, you become less fit and less healthy. 

When people in their 50s include high-intensity intervals, their cardio health remains high. With the right stimuli, bone density improves as well. Research has shown that even women with very low bone density can tolerate the high loading required to increase bone mineral density as long as it was introduced gradually and with good technique.


One major change many exercisers experience is a need for more recovery time between rigorous workouts. A college athlete might be able to handle five sessions of hard sprints a week, whereas someone in their 50s might be able to handle only one such workout a week.


In your 50s, it's all about maintaining the intensity of your workouts. In addition, pay attention to clues like soreness and fatigue to choose the right number of recovery days in your workout week.

Stay Active (in your 50s), Keep Moving and
Enjoy Your Food

Friday, July 27, 2018

Fit For Life: Your 40s

Your body changes with each passing year - and your workout program should, too. "Fitness is a marathon" says trainer Billy Anderson. It's the accumulation of fitness over time that matters. Focusing on strength, coordination, cardiovascular fitness and mobility is vital at every age. Today I continue a series of blogs offering insights on what it takes to stay fit in each decade of life.

In Your 40s

HIT RESTART

Whether or not you're a regular exerciser, life has a way of catching up to you by the time you hit 40. For active types, nagging injuries nag a little louder. For recreational athletes, performance begins to drop and recovery takes longer. For people with sedentary jobs, the hours in a chair compound and can lead to tight hips, shoulders, backs, necks and knees.

Many of these long-term minor pains and injuries can be traced to changes in the fascia - the pliable connective tissue running through your body. Over time, it dehydrates and stiffens in response to habitual movement patterns, whether active, like running, or passive, like sitting. Massage, foam rolling and other bodywork modalities can keep these tissues supple so you can continue to move well, and without pain, for decades to come.

The 40s can also find you in the exercise doldrums. You have probably established, and then broken, an exercise habit several times. The key is to go easy on yourself when you fall out of the exercise habit  - and then steer yourself back to it in another season. One remedy for exercise doldrums is to keep exploring new types of movement. Dance, martial arts, or outdoor exercise can work wonders for your brain, mood and fascia.


In your 40s, it's time to focus on maintaining supple movement and 
exploring novel activities to push through the exercise doldrums. 

Stay Active (in your 40s), Keep Moving and
Enjoy Your Food